Events, SharePoint

The SharePoint Journey

Microsoft Ignite will open the window to our vision, strategy, and future for SharePoint and provide a first look at most recent developments with SharePoint Server 2016.  From the business value for organizations looking to modernize their workplace and infrastructure to the technical value it will deliver to IT Professionals and Developers as well as new hybrid investments for those customers looking to enrich their existing investments with cloud innovation.

With Microsoft Ignite just around the corner, it’s time to look back and provide a little historical SharePoint information.

There have been 5SharePoint releases.

1997-1998

“Exchange and SharePoint become best friends”

Exchange Server works on a new information store (Web Store) to support document, web content, and e-mail management.

Codename Tahoe (the genesis of SharePoint Products and Technologies) advances Platinum introducing document management capabilities through WebDAV – Document Authoring and Versioning in addition to an improved search and indexing engine.

Platinum and Tahoe would represent a new, next generation messaging, collaboration, and document management platform.

Learn more about the evolution of SharePoint’s storage architecture at http://blogs.technet.com/b/wbaer/archive/2012/12/20/shredded-storage-and-the-evolution-of-sharepoint-s-storage-architecture.aspx.

1999

“A gem is found in nuggets”

Microsoft makes available a free download called Digital Dashboard Starter Kit introducing our first portal framework.   Solutions based on the starter kit enabled a user interface that could reside within Outlook through visual aids called “nuggets” that displayed information from a variety of content sources – “nuggets” would later take on the name Web Parts.

2000-2001

“A rolling milestone gathers no moss”

Tahoe reaches its beta 1 milestone in early 2000 and the Digital Dashboard Starter Kit is renamed the Digital Dashboard Resource Kit.  In mid-2000 Tahoe reaches another important milestone (Beta 2) with important changes to include a new user interface based on the Digital Dashboard Resource Kit creating a “true” portal user experience and subsequently retiring its codename in favor of SharePoint Portal Server 2001.

2001

“So it begins”

SharePoint Portal Server 2001 is released and creates a portal web site that allows users to share documents and search for information across the organization and enterprise, including SharePoint Team Services-based Web sites—all within one extensible portal interface. SharePoint Portal Server includes robust document management features that allow companies to incorporate business processes into their portal solution, but is limited by the Web Store and Digital Dashboard.

Web Store performance and scalability limited the expansion of SharePoint and Digital Dashboards were developed outside of the core development platform (Visual Studio) which limited the audience for extensibility.

In parallel the fledging portal market began to see unprecedented growth and overlap with the existing  Web Content Management (WCM) market which included CMS 2001.

As the growth and adoption of SharePoint Portal Server 2001 continued to rise in the then new portals market, SharePoint Team Services was released in conjunction with Office 2000 providing web-based team-centric collaboration capabilities.

Untitled

2002-2003

“Raise the roof”

The Web Store, the storage foundation for SharePoint Portal Server 2001 is replaced with SQL Server as the storage backend – on the other side of the topology Digital Dashboards were phased out in favor of ASP.NET improving overall scalability and portal capabilities at the expense of some document management capabilities, notably document profiles and workflow that were to be removed from the upcoming SharePoint release.

This was also a tumultuous time for SharePoint Team Services – but in the end the teams responsible for SharePoint Portal Server and SharePoint Team Services were converged.  In parallel to the changes affecting the technologies that powered SharePoint, CMS evolved as well leveraging ASP.NET on the frontend and delivered as CMS 2002.

In 2002 SharePoint Team Services officially was renamed as Windows SharePoint Services (WSS) and packaged in Windows Server 2003 as a Feature of the server – like SharePoint Portal Server it also provided a collaboration store and Web Part user interface build on ASP.NET.

In this same period SharePoint Portal Server (v2 at the time) was officially branded Microsoft Office SharePoint Portal Server 2003 (no longer referred to as codename Matrix), built on top of Windows SharePoint Services, but delivered independent of Windows Server 2003.

sharepointserver2003

This new release contained important scenarios such as search and indexing, but also ushered in personalization (people-centric collaboration), and enhanced taxonomy capabilities with improved overall manageability.

2004-2005

“Got SOX”?

SOX or Sarbanes-Oxley is introduced to the world and changes document and records management practices.  In response, the CMS and SharePoint Portal Server groups converge in 2004 and Web Parts built using ASP.NET were enabled for developers.  The extensibility era begins…

Near the end of 2005 ASP.NET v2 launches to include new native Web Parts and Windows Workflow Foundation becomes a native add-on to Windows Server that provides a new workflow service that other applications can build on.

2005

“Time to Groove”

In 2005, Grove was acquired, a peer-to-peer (P2P) team-based collaboration product that also includes synchronization of SharePoint sites.

2006-2007

“Who puts MOSS on a server anyway”

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 is born signifying a leap forward in experiences.

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 was defined as a Microsoft server product that creates a portal website that allows users to share documents and search for information across the organization and enterprise within one extensible portal interface.

SharePoint-2007

Windows SharePoint Services moves forward, but now as a standalone product versus Windows Server feature.

Groove Server 2007 is released with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007, which provides the server software and tools that IT organizations can use to best deploy, manage, and integrate the Groove functionality that comes with the new Groove 2007.

2009

SharePoint Server 2010 is released, the first in two successive releases to drop the Microsoft Office branding.

SP2010

Groove is renamed SharePoint Workspace and released as Microsoft SharePoint Workspace 2010, the server management platform remains Groove Server and released as Groove Server 2010.

2012

10/11/12 the world is introduced to the most recent generation of SharePoint Products and Technologies, SharePoint 2013.

prev_EN_ShrPt_Srvr_PT_C_rgb

Personal sites, a staple of SharePoint people-centric collaboration are rebranded and paired with a new sync client powered by Groove as SkyDrive Pro, over the course of the SharePoint Server 2013 release these capabilities will become OneDrive for Business.

2015

The next generation of SharePoint is revealed as SharePoint Server 2016 – want to learn more…  Register now for Microsoft Ignite.

Standard
Uncategorized

December 2009 Cumulative Update Packages for SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0

December 2009 Cumulative Updates are available for download for Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0.


For additional download information and detailed descriptions of the December 2009 Cumulative Update visit the Updates Resource Center for SharePoint Products and Technologies at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/office/sharepointserver/bb735839.aspx.


Additional Resources


Update Center for Microsoft Office, Office Servers, and Related Products

Standard
Uncategorized

Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies Infrastructure Update Released!

The Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies Infrastructure Update has been officially released. The update includes both improvements in core functional scenarios such as Office SharePoint Server Search with the introduction of S2 in addition to management enhancements resolving core customer issues such as scalability and performance improvements to support search incremental crawl (WSS), patch and upgrade of WSS server farms where a large number of host header-based site collections are implemented, support for Kerberos authentication to access SSP Web services, and more…


Download


Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007


x86 – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=256CE3C3-6A42-4953-8E1B-E0BF27FD465B&displaylang=en


x64 – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=6E4F31AB-AF25-47DF-9BF1-423E248FA6FC&displaylang=en


Windows SharePoint Services 3.0


x86 – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=3811C371-0E83-47C8-976B-0B7F26A3B3C4&displaylang=en


x64 – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=3A74E566-CB4A-4DB9-851C-E3FBBE5E6D6E&displaylang=en

Standard
Uncategorized

SELECT FullUrl [Please Don’t] from dbo.Webs

I was just browsing Mike Fitzmaurice’s blog and I’m glad to see he continues to dissuade direct database access with Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies.  All too often I’ve seen what was conceptually a good idea, result in performance, scalability, and manageability problems long term.  While initially an otherwise simple SELECT statement, yes, even read, may be perceived as non-intrusive, problems later down the road may be compounded by what was offered as a “simple means” to getting a particular task accomplished.


Most often instances of directly reading and/or writing to SharePoint Products and Technologies databases occur in what I call a dotted-line deployment, where there is little or no separation of those who are responsible for Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies and those responsible for hosting and maintaining the database servers.  The problem is less frequent where there are distinct groups of individuals responsible for their respective technologies, a more physically separated deployment and management approach.  But in either case, the possibility exists.


So what’s the problem:


Consider dirty reads, while SQL servers’ default behavior is Read Committed Isolation Model, in this scenario while SQL server will not allow transactions to read data written to a table by an uncommitted transaction, phantom and non-readable reads are fair game.  And then we have record locking, so in the event the individuals actions result in concurrent collisions, SQL server will do its best to protect itself from the individual or otherwise you from yourself, but this comes with a measurable performance penalty.  Since this post is intended to promote a programmatic approach to accessing data stored in Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies databases, we won’t discuss the last set of statements with using SELECT and disabling record locking.  😉


With that said, I am equally pleased to see both the Microsoft Asset Inventory Tool and Nintex Reporting 2008 offer a robust reporting solution that avoid directly accessing the database(s), using SOAP, WMI, and other providers to extrapolate the data and provide a presentation layer for the end-user or IT Pro.  Not only are these great reporting applications, but serve as an example of how a well thought solution can be implemented without compromising the integrity of the environment.


In conclusion, use the Object Model when and wherever possible to replace directly accessing Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies databases, it provides protection in the form of supportability, reduces operational complexity, and enables an upgrade path for your solutions when the time arises and can manage database schema changes, all of which are not guaranteed when manipulating databases directly with Transact-SQL and/or other methods.


Resources


SharePoint Database Access


http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb861829.aspx


Office Development (Microsoft SharePoint Products and Technologies)


http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb931739.aspx

Standard
Uncategorized

Announcing the SharePoint Administration Toolkit

The Microsoft SharePoint Administration Toolkit contains functionality to help administrateer (good catch A Mondale) and manage Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Windows SharePoint Services version 3.0. This toolkit contains two new functions – the ability to perform bulk operations on site collections and a Stsadm operation to update alert emails after a Web application has changed URLs.


 Download x86 | x64

Standard