Events, SharePoint

The SharePoint Journey

Microsoft Ignite will open the window to our vision, strategy, and future for SharePoint and provide a first look at most recent developments with SharePoint Server 2016.  From the business value for organizations looking to modernize their workplace and infrastructure to the technical value it will deliver to IT Professionals and Developers as well as new hybrid investments for those customers looking to enrich their existing investments with cloud innovation.

With Microsoft Ignite just around the corner, it’s time to look back and provide a little historical SharePoint information.

There have been 5SharePoint releases.

1997-1998

“Exchange and SharePoint become best friends”

Exchange Server works on a new information store (Web Store) to support document, web content, and e-mail management.

Codename Tahoe (the genesis of SharePoint Products and Technologies) advances Platinum introducing document management capabilities through WebDAV – Document Authoring and Versioning in addition to an improved search and indexing engine.

Platinum and Tahoe would represent a new, next generation messaging, collaboration, and document management platform.

Learn more about the evolution of SharePoint’s storage architecture at http://blogs.technet.com/b/wbaer/archive/2012/12/20/shredded-storage-and-the-evolution-of-sharepoint-s-storage-architecture.aspx.

1999

“A gem is found in nuggets”

Microsoft makes available a free download called Digital Dashboard Starter Kit introducing our first portal framework.   Solutions based on the starter kit enabled a user interface that could reside within Outlook through visual aids called “nuggets” that displayed information from a variety of content sources – “nuggets” would later take on the name Web Parts.

2000-2001

“A rolling milestone gathers no moss”

Tahoe reaches its beta 1 milestone in early 2000 and the Digital Dashboard Starter Kit is renamed the Digital Dashboard Resource Kit.  In mid-2000 Tahoe reaches another important milestone (Beta 2) with important changes to include a new user interface based on the Digital Dashboard Resource Kit creating a “true” portal user experience and subsequently retiring its codename in favor of SharePoint Portal Server 2001.

2001

“So it begins”

SharePoint Portal Server 2001 is released and creates a portal web site that allows users to share documents and search for information across the organization and enterprise, including SharePoint Team Services-based Web sites—all within one extensible portal interface. SharePoint Portal Server includes robust document management features that allow companies to incorporate business processes into their portal solution, but is limited by the Web Store and Digital Dashboard.

Web Store performance and scalability limited the expansion of SharePoint and Digital Dashboards were developed outside of the core development platform (Visual Studio) which limited the audience for extensibility.

In parallel the fledging portal market began to see unprecedented growth and overlap with the existing  Web Content Management (WCM) market which included CMS 2001.

As the growth and adoption of SharePoint Portal Server 2001 continued to rise in the then new portals market, SharePoint Team Services was released in conjunction with Office 2000 providing web-based team-centric collaboration capabilities.

Untitled

2002-2003

“Raise the roof”

The Web Store, the storage foundation for SharePoint Portal Server 2001 is replaced with SQL Server as the storage backend – on the other side of the topology Digital Dashboards were phased out in favor of ASP.NET improving overall scalability and portal capabilities at the expense of some document management capabilities, notably document profiles and workflow that were to be removed from the upcoming SharePoint release.

This was also a tumultuous time for SharePoint Team Services – but in the end the teams responsible for SharePoint Portal Server and SharePoint Team Services were converged.  In parallel to the changes affecting the technologies that powered SharePoint, CMS evolved as well leveraging ASP.NET on the frontend and delivered as CMS 2002.

In 2002 SharePoint Team Services officially was renamed as Windows SharePoint Services (WSS) and packaged in Windows Server 2003 as a Feature of the server – like SharePoint Portal Server it also provided a collaboration store and Web Part user interface build on ASP.NET.

In this same period SharePoint Portal Server (v2 at the time) was officially branded Microsoft Office SharePoint Portal Server 2003 (no longer referred to as codename Matrix), built on top of Windows SharePoint Services, but delivered independent of Windows Server 2003.

sharepointserver2003

This new release contained important scenarios such as search and indexing, but also ushered in personalization (people-centric collaboration), and enhanced taxonomy capabilities with improved overall manageability.

2004-2005

“Got SOX”?

SOX or Sarbanes-Oxley is introduced to the world and changes document and records management practices.  In response, the CMS and SharePoint Portal Server groups converge in 2004 and Web Parts built using ASP.NET were enabled for developers.  The extensibility era begins…

Near the end of 2005 ASP.NET v2 launches to include new native Web Parts and Windows Workflow Foundation becomes a native add-on to Windows Server that provides a new workflow service that other applications can build on.

2005

“Time to Groove”

In 2005, Grove was acquired, a peer-to-peer (P2P) team-based collaboration product that also includes synchronization of SharePoint sites.

2006-2007

“Who puts MOSS on a server anyway”

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 is born signifying a leap forward in experiences.

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 was defined as a Microsoft server product that creates a portal website that allows users to share documents and search for information across the organization and enterprise within one extensible portal interface.

SharePoint-2007

Windows SharePoint Services moves forward, but now as a standalone product versus Windows Server feature.

Groove Server 2007 is released with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007, which provides the server software and tools that IT organizations can use to best deploy, manage, and integrate the Groove functionality that comes with the new Groove 2007.

2009

SharePoint Server 2010 is released, the first in two successive releases to drop the Microsoft Office branding.

SP2010

Groove is renamed SharePoint Workspace and released as Microsoft SharePoint Workspace 2010, the server management platform remains Groove Server and released as Groove Server 2010.

2012

10/11/12 the world is introduced to the most recent generation of SharePoint Products and Technologies, SharePoint 2013.

prev_EN_ShrPt_Srvr_PT_C_rgb

Personal sites, a staple of SharePoint people-centric collaboration are rebranded and paired with a new sync client powered by Groove as SkyDrive Pro, over the course of the SharePoint Server 2013 release these capabilities will become OneDrive for Business.

2015

The next generation of SharePoint is revealed as SharePoint Server 2016 – want to learn more…  Register now for Microsoft Ignite.

Standard
Events, SharePoint

Top 3 sessions to learn more about SharePoint Server 2016 at Microsoft Ignite

Top 3 sessions to learn more about SharePoint Server 2016 at Microsoft Ignite.

BRK2188 What’s new for IT Professionals in SharePoint 2016

http://ignite.microsoft.com/session/sessionmoreinfo/?topicid=c9ae257c-3695-e411-b87f-00155d5066d7

In this session you’ll learn about the core platform investments we’re making in SharePoint 2016 from deployment and implementation, patching and upgrade, improvements, in addition to both new and changes to existing services in SharePoint.  We’ll demonstrate new installation techniques, monitoring, and more.  If you’re responsible for deploying, managing, or planning SharePoint implementations this session is for you.

FND2203 The Evolution of SharePoint: Overview and Roadmap

http://ignite.microsoft.com/session/sessionmoreinfo/?topicid=84f35ee3-6d81-e411-b87f-00155d5066d7

In this Foundation Keynote we’ll discuss the evolution of SharePoint in the cloud and on-premises, share information about our investment areas in SharePoint 2016, demonstrate some of these investments and set the stage for the week of SharePoint ahead at Microsoft Ignite.

 

Implementing Next Generation SharePoint Hybrid Search with the Cloud Search Service Application

http://ignite.microsoft.com/session/sessionmoreinfo/?topicid=5ce11d0b-3595-e411-b87f-00155d5066d7

This session is intended for IT Implementers / Professionals looking to understand the advanced hybrid search capabilities included in SharePoint Server 2016.

Standard
Administration, Events

Quick Starting Demos and Windows PowerShell

Preparing virtual machines for demonstrations can be a tedious process, compounding this is when virtual machines need to be started or shut down in a specific order.  For example, starting database servers prior to starting web servers, or starting the preferred active node before the passive node.  Starting those machines; however, is only a portion of the process, in most cases you will want them to be “available” before starting a subsequent machine.  For example, having an iSCSI Target available before the consuming iSCSI initiators are available.  Windows PowerShell, is perfect to support this scenario – it’s something I use almost everyday and have shared an example (below) of how you can accomplish all of these tasks…

So what does it do?

Provides parameters to Start/Shut Down one or more virtual machines.

Checks for process elevation, escapes if the script is not run elevated.

Starts the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management Service if not running.

Iterates through an array of virtual machines stored in a .txt file.

Starts each virtual machine in the .txt file and waits for the heartbeat status to report ‘OK’ before starting the next virtual machine in the list.  Virtual machines are started in the order they appear in the source file, waiting ensures a clean start up – particularly where a defined start order with dependencies exists.

Shuts down virtual machines in the reverse order they were started by reading the source file bottom to top.  Waits for the virtual machine heartbeat status to report ‘’ before processing the next virtual machine.

Displays a progress bar to report on the status of the operation.

Script

[CmdletBinding(ConfirmImpact="Low")]

Param(
     [Parameter(Mandatory=$True,Position=0,ValueFromPipeline=$False,HelpMessage="Operation to perform on one or more virtual machines.")][ValidateSet("Start","Stop")]
     [String]$operation,
     [Parameter(Mandatory=$True,Position=1,ValueFromPipeline=$False,HelpMessage="Collection of virtual machines on which operation is to be performed.")][ValidateNotNullorEmpty()]
     [String]$source
)

$ErrorActionPreference = "Stop"

Process
{
     $identity = [System.Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity]::GetCurrent()
     $principal = New-Object System.Security.Principal.WindowsPrincipal($identity)
     $role = [System.Security.Principal.WindowsBuiltInRole]::Administrator
     $elevated = $principal.IsInRole($role)

     If ($operation -eq "Start")
     {
         $service = Get-Service -Name vmms

         If ($service.Status -ne "Running")
         {
             Try
             {
                 If ($elevated)
                 {
                     Start-Service $service

                     Write-Host "Starting the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management Service."

                     Start-Sleep -s 10

                     Clear-Host
                 }
                 Else
                 {
                     Write-Host "Requires elevation."
                     break
                 }
             }
             Catch
             {
                 [System.Exception]
                 Write-Host "Could not start Virtual Machine Management Service."
                 break
             }
         }

         $exists = Test-Path "$(Get-Location)$source.txt" 

         If ($exists -eq $True)
         {
             Try
             {
                 $list = Get-Content "$(Get-Location)$source.txt"
             }
             Catch
             {
                 [System.Exception]
                 break
             }
         }
         Else
         {
             Write-Host "The file could not be found: $source.  The document name or path is not valid."
             break
         }

         For ( $count = 0; $count -lt $list.Count; $count++
         { 
             $guest = $list[$count]

             $progress = 100 / $list.Count * ($count + 1)

             Write-Progress -Activity "Starting virtual machine…" -CurrentOperation "Starting…" -Status $guest -PercentComplete $progress

             Try
             {
                 If ($elevated)
                 {
                     Start-VM -Name $guest
                 }
                 Else
                 {
                     Write-Host "Requires elevation."
                     break
                 }
             }
             Catch
             {
                 Write-Host "Could not start virtual machine(s)."
                 break
             }

             Write-Progress -Activity "Starting virtual machine…" -CurrentOperation "Waiting…" -Status $guest -PercentComplete $progress

             do {Start-Sleep -milliseconds 100
             until ((Get-VMIntegrationService $guest | ?{$_.name -eq "Heartbeat"}).PrimaryStatusDescription -eq "OK")
         }
     }

     ElseIf ($operation -eq "Stop")
     {
         $exists = Test-Path "$(Get-Location)$source.txt" 

         If ($exists -eq $True)
         {
             Try
             {
                 $list = Get-Content "$(Get-Location)$source.txt"
             }
             Catch
             {
                 [System.Exception]
                 break
             }
         }
         Else
         {
             Write-Host "The file could not be found: $source.  The document name or path is not valid."
             break
         }

         For ($count = $list.Length1; $count -ge 0 ; $count)
         { 
             $guest = $list[$count]

             $progress = 100 / $list.Count * ($count + 1)

             Write-Progress -Activity "Stopping virtual machine…" -CurrentOperation "Stopping…" -Status $guest -PercentComplete $progress
    
             Try
             {
                 Stop-VM -Name $guest
             }
             Catch
             {
                 Write-Host "Could not stop virtual machine."
                 break
             }

             Write-Progress -Activity "Stopping virtual machine…" -CurrentOperation "Waiting…" -Status $guest -PercentComplete $progress

             do {Start-Sleep -milliseconds 100
             until ((Get-VMIntegrationService $guest | ?{$_.name -eq "Heartbeat"}).PrimaryStatusDescription -ne "OK")
         }

         Start-Sleep -s 10

         If ($elevated)
         {
             Try
             {
                 Stop-Service vmms
                 Write-Host "Stopping the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management Service…"
             }
             Catch
             {
                 [System.Exception]
                 Write-Host "Could not stop the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management Service."
                 break
             }
         }
         Else
         {
             Write-Host "Requires elevation."
             break
         }

         Clear-Host
     }
}

Usage

Using the scripts requires 1) saving the attached script as <name>.ps1 2) creating source .txt file with virtual machines listed in the preferred start up order.  For example,

Machine1

Machine2

Machine3

3) Saving the script and source .txt file in the same location.

4) Running the script as <name>.ps1 –Operation Start –Source <name>

Standard
Administration, Events

Quick Starting Demos with Windows PowerShell

Preparing virtual machines for demonstrations can be a tedious process, compounding this is when virtual machines need to be started or shut down in a specific order.  For example, starting database servers prior to starting web servers, or starting the preferred active node before the passive node.  Starting those machines; however, is only a portion of the process, in most cases you will want them to be “available” before starting a subsequent machine.  For example, having an iSCSI Target available before the consuming iSCSI initiators are available.  Windows PowerShell, is perfect to support this scenario – it’s something I use almost everyday and have shared an example (below) of how you can accomplish all of these tasks…

So what does it do?

Provides parameters to Start/Shut Down one or more virtual machines.

Checks for process elevation, escapes if the script is not run elevated.

Starts the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management Service if not running.

Iterates through an array of virtual machines stored in a .txt file.

Starts each virtual machine in the .txt file and waits for the heartbeat status to report ‘OK’ before starting the next virtual machine in the list.  Virtual machines are started in the order they appear in the source file, waiting ensures a clean start up – particularly where a defined start order with dependencies exists.

Shuts down virtual machines in the reverse order they were started by reading the source file bottom to top.  Waits for the virtual machine heartbeat status to report ‘’ before processing the next virtual machine.

Displays a progress bar to report on the status of the operation.

Script

[CmdletBinding(ConfirmImpact="Low")]

Param(
     [Parameter(Mandatory=$True,Position=0,ValueFromPipeline=$False,HelpMessage="Operation to perform on one or more virtual machines.")][ValidateSet("Start","Stop")]
     [String]$operation,
     [Parameter(Mandatory=$True,Position=1,ValueFromPipeline=$False,HelpMessage="Collection of virtual machines on which operation is to be performed.")][ValidateNotNullorEmpty()]
     [String]$source
)

$ErrorActionPreference = "Stop"

Process
{
     $identity = [System.Security.Principal.WindowsIdentity]::GetCurrent()
     $principal = New-Object System.Security.Principal.WindowsPrincipal($identity)
     $role = [System.Security.Principal.WindowsBuiltInRole]::Administrator
     $elevated = $principal.IsInRole($role)

     If ($operation -eq "Start")
     {
         $service = Get-Service -Name vmms

         If ($service.Status -ne "Running")
         {
             Try
             {
                 If ($elevated)
                 {
                     Start-Service $service

                     Write-Host "Starting the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management Service."

                     Start-Sleep -s 10

                     Clear-Host
                 }
                 Else
                 {
                     Write-Host "Requires elevation."
                     break
                 }
             }
             Catch
             {
                 [System.Exception]
                 Write-Host "Could not start Virtual Machine Management Service."
                 break
             }
         }

         $exists = Test-Path "$(Get-Location)$source.txt" 

         If ($exists -eq $True)
         {
             Try
             {
                 $list = Get-Content "$(Get-Location)$source.txt"
             }
             Catch
             {
                 [System.Exception]
                 break
             }
         }
         Else
         {
             Write-Host "The file could not be found: $source.  The document name or path is not valid."
             break
         }

         For ( $count = 0; $count -lt $list.Count; $count++
         { 
             $guest = $list[$count]

             $progress = 100 / $list.Count * ($count + 1)

             Write-Progress -Activity "Starting virtual machine…" -CurrentOperation "Starting…" -Status $guest -PercentComplete $progress

             Try
             {
                 If ($elevated)
                 {
                     Start-VM -Name $guest
                 }
                 Else
                 {
                     Write-Host "Requires elevation."
                     break
                 }
             }
             Catch
             {
                 Write-Host "Could not start virtual machine(s)."
                 break
             }

             Write-Progress -Activity "Starting virtual machine…" -CurrentOperation "Waiting…" -Status $guest -PercentComplete $progress

             do {Start-Sleep -milliseconds 100
             until ((Get-VMIntegrationService $guest | ?{$_.name -eq "Heartbeat"}).PrimaryStatusDescription -eq "OK")
         }
     }

     ElseIf ($operation -eq "Stop")
     {
         $exists = Test-Path "$(Get-Location)$source.txt" 

         If ($exists -eq $True)
         {
             Try
             {
                 $list = Get-Content "$(Get-Location)$source.txt"
             }
             Catch
             {
                 [System.Exception]
                 break
             }
         }
         Else
         {
             Write-Host "The file could not be found: $source.  The document name or path is not valid."
             break
         }

         For ($count = $list.Length1; $count -ge 0 ; $count)
         { 
             $guest = $list[$count]

             $progress = 100 / $list.Count * ($count + 1)

             Write-Progress -Activity "Stopping virtual machine…" -CurrentOperation "Stopping…" -Status $guest -PercentComplete $progress
    
             Try
             {
                 Stop-VM -Name $guest
             }
             Catch
             {
                 Write-Host "Could not stop virtual machine."
                 break
             }

             Write-Progress -Activity "Stopping virtual machine…" -CurrentOperation "Waiting…" -Status $guest -PercentComplete $progress

             do {Start-Sleep -milliseconds 100
             until ((Get-VMIntegrationService $guest | ?{$_.name -eq "Heartbeat"}).PrimaryStatusDescription -ne "OK")
         }

         Start-Sleep -s 10

         If ($elevated)
         {
             Try
             {
                 Stop-Service vmms
                 Write-Host "Stopping the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management Service…"
             }
             Catch
             {
                 [System.Exception]
                 Write-Host "Could not stop the Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management Service."
                 break
             }
         }
         Else
         {
             Write-Host "Requires elevation."
             break
         }

         Clear-Host
     }
}

Usage

Using the scripts requires 1) saving the attached script as <name>.ps1 2) creating source .txt file with virtual machines listed in the preferred start up order.  For example,

Machine1

Machine2

Machine3

3) Saving the script and source .txt file in the same location.

4) Running the script as <name>.ps1 –Operation Start –Source <name>

Standard
Events, SharePoint Conference

Not to be missed…SharePoint Conference 2014

SharePoint Conference 2014 is less than ~75 business days away, if you’re an IT Professional, implementer, or decision maker you don’t want to miss this SharePoint Conference.

In today’s world of converging technologies and operating models, IT Professionals are under more demand to deliver value and foster innovation within organizations.  The 2014 SharePoint Conference for IT Professionals recognizes these challenges and delivers deep technical and business content to ensure the IT Professional not only comes away with a more fundamental understand of SharePoint, but also its related technologies and infrastructure.  From Active Directory to Windows Azure you’ll find content covering a
variety of topics and technologies to help position your organization better now and in the future through continued technological innovations and changes in our global and dynamic marketplace.

The 2014 SharePoint Conference is not only about connecting you with the latest technology trends, but also connecting you with your peers.  Through its sessions you’ll learn from the foremost SharePoint experts and through a number of scheduled day and evening events you’ll be able to connect with peers and technology leaders one on one in casual settings to share ideas and learn best practices.

For our core IT Professional audience we’ll have over 100 dedicated sessions, 40+ Hands on Labs, deep demonstrations, and more. Whether you’re just learning about SharePoint 2013 or have been working with SharePoint Server 2013 you’ll find a variety of sessions, chalk talks, and labs that provide a blend of overview, deep dive experience, and best practice recommendations.

Need more convincing to register today, have a look at our pre- and post-conference opportunities. Whether you’re looking to deploy in the cloud or remain on premises we have sessions before, throughout, and after the conference to help you meet your learning goals. 

The 2014 SharePoint Conference is about connecting you with technology, your peers, and the cloud.  Don’t miss your chance to be part of the world’s largest SharePoint conference and register today.

By the way, did I mention it’s Las Vegas?

New to SPC?  Learn more about it.

Standard
Events, SharePoint

SharePoint Conferences, Looking Back…

With SharePoint Conference 2014 registration now open, it seems appropriate to look back and provide just a little historical SPC information.

There have been 5 previous SharePoint Conferences.

2006

The inaugural SharePoint Conference, SharePoint Conference 2006 was held in Bellevue, Washington on May 15th, 2006 at the Meydenbauer Convention Center with the keynote delivered by Bill Gates.  The theme…”Connecting People, Process, and Information”.

2008

The second SharePoint Conference was held in Seattle, Washington at the Washington State Trade and Convention Center on March 4th, 2008 with the keynote delivered by Kurt Delbene and Bill Gates.

2009

18 months passed prior to the next SharePoint Conference in 2009 which is also the first time the conference was not held in Washington.  SharePoint Conference 2009 was held in Las Vegas, Nevada on November 12th, 2009 at the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino.  The keynote was delivered by Steve Ballmer and the attendee party featured Huey Lewis and the News.

2011

The next conference was held on October 3rd, 2011 in Anaheim, California at the Anaheim Convention Center.  The SharePoint Conference 2011 keynote was delivered by Kurt Delbene and Jeff Teper.  The attendee party was held at Disneyland Resort in California.

2012

The next SharePoint Conference was held in 2012, returning to Las Vegas, Nevada and the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino.  The keynote was delivered by Jeff Teper, Scott Guthrie, and Jared Spataro.  The attendee party featured Bon Jovi.

2014

We’re returning to Las Vegas, Nevada, but now at The Venetian Las Vegas on March 3rd, 2014.  Register today and become part of SharePoint history…

 

For more SharePoint Conference history see also http://www.sharepointconference.com/conference/history.

Standard
Events, SharePoint Conference

SharePoint Conference 2012

The 2012 SharePoint Conference is in just over 30 days. This is the SharePoint event you don’t want to miss. For our core IT Professional audience we’ll have over 150 dedicated sessions, 40+ Hands on Labs, deep demonstrations, and more. Whether you’re just learning about SharePoint 2013 or have been working with SharePoint Server 2013 Preview you’ll find a variety of sessions, chalk talks, and labs that provide a blend of overview, deep dive experience, and best practice recommendations.

A small sample of sessions follows below; refer to http://www.mssharepointconference.com/Pages/sessionBrowser.aspx for a complete list of available sessions.

Overview Sessions

What’s new for IT Professionals in SharePoint Server 2013

This is the session you don’t want to miss. Learn about SharePoint 2013 investment areas specific to IT Professionals including new features and capabilities. This session will provide a high-level overview and provide background for the deep dive and specific capabilities sessions that follow.

What’s New with Service Applications in SharePoint Server 2013

SharePoint Server 2013 provides a variety of new service applications designed to reduce barriers to open collaboration and enable unified views into work items. This session will also cover changes to service applications available in SharePoint Server 2010 carried forward into SharePoint Server 2013.

Deep Dive Sessions

Request Management in SharePoint 2013

You’ve probably heard of Request Management, maybe you’ve used it. Learn more about Request Management in depth, how it’s configured, and when and how it should be used in support of your SharePoint infrastructure.

Leveraging Server to Server OAuth Identity Platform in SharePoint 2013

This session provides you with unique security/identity information that will help you to win customers over competitors from the security standpoint. The key enabler for these scenarios is the server-to-server (S2S) OAuth platform, which extends the OAuth 2.0 protocol. Learn how the S2S platform allows to seamlessly transition user identity across the O365 services as well as in on-premise Office Server products.

Best Practice Sessions

Claims Based Authentication – Migrating to the new SharePoint 2013 Identity Model

Claims Based Authentication is the default identity model in SharePoint Server 2013 and claims migration becomes a critical architectural decision.  In this session you will learn about planning guidelines, best practices, and common scenarios and considerations when migrating from Office SharePoint Server 2007 and SharePoint Server 2010 to SharePoint Server 2013.  

Making Fast Sites Faster with Performance-related Features in SharePoint 2013

Once you have ensured that your site avoids all the performance anti-patterns, it’s time to go to the next level and leverage all the coolness SharePoint 2013 has to offer. This session will go into detail about new features such as Smooth Transitions and Client-side Rendering.

How To Sessions

Automating SharePoint Governance and Management

Technology represents what’s to be governed and this session shows how to automate those processes and capabilities related to governance.

This session unveils a framework for automating SharePoint administrative tasks to enforce your service and information management policies. From it you’ll take away a set of tools that you can apply and extend to create a secure, proxied model for SharePoint administration.

Deployment Wizard: SharePoint 2013 Installation Tips, Tricks and Scripts

This session shares tricks and tools for deploying SharePoint servers and farms on premises. Learn how to deploy physical and virtual environments, taking advantage of the full suite of Microsoft deployment tools. Ensure that your implementation is locked-down with least-privilege service and administration accounts and examine the dependencies on other platforms including Identity Services, DNS, and SQL Server. Take away a checklist of considerations, and scripts to help automate your deployment.

Keep up to date on sessions, scheduling, and more at http://www.mssharepointconference.com.

Standard